Nunavik Villages: Inukjuak (The giant)

The many archaeological sites scattered along the meandering river evidence thousands of years of inhabitation. The land around Inukjuak is marked by gently rolling hills and open spaces, which endow the landscape with a "silent beauty", as local Inuit like to describe it.

From the hills, one may admire a splendid view of the village, its small port, the Hopewell Islands and Hudson Bay. In spring, ice between these islands and the mainland is moved by the action of tides and currents to create a spectacular field of immense upraised blocks of ice.

At the beginning of the 20th century, the area was given the name Port Harrison and the French fur trading company Révillon Frères established a post there. For its part, the Hudson’s Bay Company (HBC) opened its post in 1920. Competition between these companies ended in 1936 when the HBC bought out Révillon Frères. The subsequent HBC fur trade monopoly continued until 1958.

The St. Thomas Anglican mission was founded in 1927. In the following years, the federal government began delivering basic community services in Inukjuak: a post office and a Royal Canadian Mounted Police attachment were opened in 1935, a nursing station in 1947 and a school in 1951. Most Inuit however continued to prefer their traditional lifestyle on the land and only began settling in the village in the 1950s. In 1962, the co-operative store opened and, in 1980, Inukjuak was legally established as a municipality.

ATTRACTIONS: 

• Daniel Weetaluktuk Museum: the museum exhibits a magnificent collection of Inuit arts and crafts, as well as traditional tools, hunting and fishing gear.

• Innalik School lobby: bas-relief sculptures depicting day-to-day life in an Inuit community are permanently on exhibit.

• Site where the oldest rocks in the world were found, setting the record at 4.28 billion years old.

• Hopewell Islands: summer nesting area of many migratory birds.

• Wildlife observation

For more information:

Northern Village of Inukjuak: 819-254-8822 / Pituvik Landholding Corporation: 819-254-8101